Painting for January 23: Where did the time go?

30 Paintings in 30 Days, acrylic, Portraits
january-23
©2017, Emma Pittson, “Hair Study no. 5“. Acrylic on canvas, 6″ x 8″ x 0.5”.

I think we can dispense with all pretense that I’m in any way keeping up with the “30 Paintings in 30 Days” challenge.  So now that that’s out of the way, let me just say that this is my favourite “hair painting” so far.  Not only did I let myself get carried away with details (so much for “daily” painting), but bonus!  I also took the reference photo myself, so, FINALLY, I can claim to have created an original painting.  Many thanks to my lovely and patient model, S-A, who’s probably convinced by now that she works with weirdos.

The Blue Lady

acrylic, Portraits
20160426_115959
©2016, Emma Pittson. “The Blue Lady”, acrylic on paper.

Every now and then, I like to get back to basics and do a proper study.  Since most of the paintings that I have planned center on portraits of women wearing late 60’s – early 70’s clothing, an image from my copy of La Fileuse (a French knitting pattern catalog) from 1968 was a good place to start.

Being a sucker for punishment, I also decided to use only white and Phthalo Blue (“the priceless troublemaker”, as Carol Marine would say).  Here’s what I learned from this particular experience:

  • I’m pretty happy with the results, but I have to say: Carol Marine was right about Phthalo Blue.  Even the tiniest drop will have far-reaching consequences.  Use with caution!
  • Along those lines, no amount of white on top of Phthalo Blue will be nice and bright.  Best to use a light touch.
  • Because I wanted crisp lines along the edges of the painting, I applied a light coat of matte medium along the edge of the artists’ tape.  The paint didn’t bleed, but it did form a kind of “shelf”.
  • Also, when you look at the painting from the side, there’s a slight difference in sheen where I applied the medium, and where I didn’t.  I’m pretty sure that can be solved by applying a varnish all over, but that reminds me that…
  • … I forgot to varnish the painting before removing the tape.  Oops.